Lancaster, PA Electrician Directory

Find licensed electrical contractors in Lancaster County, PA for Residential, Commercial & Industrial projects here!

Homeowners need electricians to install new modern circuit breaker electrical service panels replacing antiquated fuse panels. You may need extra outlets installed in an older home that didn't have electrical receptacles installed in every corner of the home. Perhaps you're installing ceiling fans and need them wired to switch panels on the walls. Or, you want to add a hot tub to your backyard and need electrical service installed. You'll find electricians available for all of these services and more here on lancaster electrical .com.

Need an industrial or commercial electrician here in Lancaster County? Whether you need high bay lighting installed or a new three phase feed for that new high powered machine your adding commercial and industrial electricians have the skill set to make every installation and upgrade run smoothly.

 



Read the latest news for licensed electrical contractors in Lancaster County, PA.

Renewables Generation Grows as Fossil Fuel Declines
Renewables Generation Grows as Fossil Fuel Declines tjohnson Thu, 07/18/2019 - 12:22

Renewables Generation Grows as Fossil Fuel Declines

According to data released each month by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), there is good news for electrical contractors involved in utility-scale renewables projects, especially wind and solar. According to FERC, the anticipated growth rate of utility-scale renewables generation continues to increase, while the anticipated growth rate of utility-scale fossil fuel generation continues to decrease.

In monthly Energy Infrastructure Updates, FERC estimates the megawatts (MW) of energy that will be added or retired in a variety of categories in the next three years.

In January, FERC’s estimates for high probability additions for utility-scale fossil fuel generation were 17 MW of new coal, 31,467 MW of new natural gas and 37 MW of new oil.

The latest data available was released this month in the May report. In it, estimates for high probability additions for utility-scale fossil fuel generation had fallen or stayed the same in all three categories. For new coal, high probability additions stayed the same at 17 MW but fell 3,204 MW for new natural gas and 12 MW for new oil.

In the same time period, FERC’s estimates for utility-scale fossil fuel generation for the next three years increased in all but the oil category. In May, the commission’s estimates increased 2,195 MW for coal and 63 MW for natural gas, while the estimate for oil retirement decreased 21 MW.

While overall estimates for fossil fuel generation continued to decrease, overall estimates for renewables generation continued to increase:

In May, FERC reported a high probability that 25,109 MW of wind and 12,952 solar generation would be added within the next three years. By May, estimates increased by 2,019 MW and 3,351 MW, respectively.

Retirements estimates for utility-scale renewables generation in the next three years grew some. In January, 0 MW of wind and 2 MW of solar were expected to be retired. In May, these numbers were updated to 239 MW of wind and 1 MW of solar.

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A Lot of Construction Activity, But Mostly in Ten States
A Lot of Construction Activity, But Mostly in Ten States tjohnson Thu, 07/18/2019 - 12:20

A Lot of Construction Activity, But Mostly in Ten States

For electrical contractors seeking construction-related work, it is no secret that the industry is booming nationwide. However, according to a new report from GlobalData, Project Insight - Construction in Key U.S. States, some states are significantly more active than others.

The report notes that the U.S. construction industry is a major contributor to the nation's economy, accounting for 4.1% of gross domestic product and employing 5.3% of the nation's total workforce. Annual expenditures in the industry reached $1.4 trillion last year, with output growing 4.4% in real gross terms.

A booming economy in general, as well as recent corporate tax cuts, combined with state and local government efforts to raise revenues for public works, have combined to drive this growth.

However, according to the report, while construction is active nationwide, it is most active in just 10 states, which account for almost 60% of the total U.S. construction market (an average of 6% per state), with the remaining 40 states accounting for the other 40% of the market (an average of just 1% per state).

The report tracked 11,208 construction projects in the United States in both the public and private sectors at all stages of development from initial announcement to execution, collectively valued at $2.7 trillion.

With a total of 1,302 projects worth $524.6 billion, California has both the largest number and greatest value of projects in the U.S. construction pipeline. In addition, the state is home to more "megaprojects" than any other state in the nation.

In second place is Texas with $425 billion in projects, the lion's share of which are energy and utility projects, valued at almost $153 billion (about one-third of the state's total project valuation).

The remaining eight states in the top 10 are, in order: New York, Florida, Washington, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Ohio, and North Carolina.

For electrical contractors in these states, work should be plentiful. For contractors in nearby states looking for work, it might be worth looking into expanding into one or more of these top 10 states.

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All-Electric Homes Light Up Sacramento
All-Electric Homes Light Up Sacramento tjohnson Fri, 07/12/2019 - 12:22

All-Electric Homes Light Up Sacramento

Utilities have taken on climate change in a number of different ways. In Sacramento, Calif., the local utility has gone all electric.

Sacramento Municipal Utility District’s (SMUD) All-Electric Smart Home project is part of the utility’s broader electrification effort. Kicked off last fall, it is designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by offering partnerships with home builders to build homes powered entirely by electricity.

This summer, the utility announced it had reached the milestone of getting commitments from developers to add 1,000 new, all-electric homes to the city’s housing stock over the next two years.

The program has reached this milestone by including every angle of the homebuilding process. All types of home builders have been engaged, ranging from small, local infill specialists to large, national builders.

Santa Monica, Calif.-based Watts Communities earned the distinction of propelling the program past the 1,000-home mark with its commitment for two all-electric developments in the community of Natomas.

In addition to the $5,000-per-home incentives, the utility also allowed the developer to include heat pump heating and cooling, heat pump water heating, and induction stoves. The homes will contain solar panels and such unique features as magnetic-induction cooking technology.

The smart home program will help SMUD meet its aggressive commitment to reach carbon neutrality by 2040 and surpass the state’s greenhouse gas reduction goals of 80 percent by 2050.

According to a study published in April by the consulting firm, Energy + Environmental Economics, electrification is the most effective decarbonization strategy for homes. The study, “Residential Building Electrification in California,” finds that electrification can reduce greenhouse gas emissions in homes by up to 60 percent in 2020 and by up to 90 percent in 2050 compared with mixed-fuel homes.

The study finds that electrification saves money, too, by creating cost savings for developers, who don’t have to lay gas lines. It can also help lower bills, saving customers anywhere from $130 to $540 per year.

SMUD expects another 1,000 all electric homes to be contracted by the end of 2019.

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Webinar Announced: How Wireless Lighting Can Take Your Business to the Next Level
Webinar Announced: How Wireless Lighting Can Take Your Business to the Next Level tjohnson Fri, 07/12/2019 - 11:27

Webinar Announced: How Wireless Lighting Can Take Your Business to the Next Level

Today’s commercial and industrial facilities expect solutions that add value beyond lighting. On Aug. 1, at 2 p.m. EDT, join Eaton’s Mike Lunn and Chris Andrews for a free one-hour webinar. They will explore the increasing demand for wireless connected lighting technology and how it can simplify controls installation, enable automatic code compliance, transmit key building data and create real future opportunities for you as this cost-effective technology becomes mainstream.

Register Now


Presenters:

Michael Lunn
Director, Product Marketing, Lighting Systems
Eaton

Michael Lunn has been with Eaton for over 20 years within the lighting control group. Holding roles of increasing responsibility from phone and field technical support, system startups, to sales and product management. Michael has a passion for lighting controls and how the installer and end user interact with them. He is a knowledge expert on energy codes and provides energy code guidance on many Eaton projects. He is a member of IES and is on the IES Progress Committee and Controls Protocol Committee. Michael received his BS from Norwich University and an MBA from Champlain College.

Chris Andrews
Product Manager, Low Voltage and Wireless Lighting Systems
Eaton

Chris Andrews is the product manager for low-voltage and wireless lighting control systems at Eaton’s Lighting business. In addition to Power over Ethernet and WaveLinx, Eaton’s wireless lighting control platform, Chris has responsibility for the Distributed Low Voltage Power system he developed in his five years at Eaton. Chris has been involved in the LED lighting industry since 2005 holding positions in product development and management. Chris holds a BS in Engineering from Mercer University and an Executive MBA from the University of Georgia.


Register Now


By registering, user grants ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR permission to share registration information with event sponsors.

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Webinar Announced: How Wireless Lighting Can Take Your Business to the Next Level
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Senate Passes Bill to Thwart Cyberattacks
Senate Passes Bill to Thwart Cyberattacks tjohnson Thu, 07/11/2019 - 11:40

Senate Passes Bill to Thwart Cyberattacks

What do we do when cyber attackers try to disrupt the nation’s power grid increasingly controlled by digital systems? Find more ways for humans to override the sophisticated systems and manually thwart attacks from becoming wholesale catastrophes.

That is exactly what Congressional lawmakers on both sides of the aisle want the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to do.

Last month the U.S. Senate passed the Securing Energy Infrastructure Act, which aims to remove vulnerabilities that could allow hackers to access the energy grid through holes in digital software systems. The bill was introduced by Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, and Jim Risch, R-Idaho, with bipartisan co-sponsors, and a House companion bill was introduced by Representatives Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md., and John Carter, R-Texas.

“As our world grows more and more connected, we have before us both new opportunities and new threats,” King said in a statement upon the bill’s passage. “Our connectivity is a strength that, if left unprotected, can be exploited as a weakness. This bill takes vital steps to improve our defenses, so the energy grid that powers our lives is not open to devastating attacks launched from across the globe.”

If the legislation is ultimately enacted, the DOE would establish a two-year pilot program within the National Laboratories to identify new classes of security vulnerabilities. Researchers would then test “retro” technologies, such as analog and nondigital control systems, purpose-built control systems and physical controls, that could be used to isolate the grid’s most critical systems from cyberattacks.

From those proposed solutions, a national strategy would be developed by a working group comprised of representatives from various federal, state and regional government agencies, the energy industry and other groups with relevant experience. The Energy Secretary would then report to Congress the feasibility of the techniques considered.

The Senate bill was included in the Intel Authorization Act, part of the National Defense Authorization Act, which passed on June 27 by a vote of 86 to 8. Both the Senate and the House cyber security bills were originally introduced in the 114th Congress in 2016, and both were reintroduced by the same authors this January.

These bills are good timing, writes Utility Dive, considering that Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chairman Neil Chatterje last month warned lawmakers that “America’s critical infrastructure is increasingly under attack by foreign adversaries.”

In written testimony for a June 12 House subcommittee hearing, Chatterjee wrote that the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau of Investigation have issued multiple public reports describing cyber-intrusion campaigns by foreign government actors against the nation’s critical infrastructure, including the electric grid.

“Physical and cyber-attacks on our critical infrastructure systems have the potential to create significant, widespread, and potentially devastating effects that threaten the health, safety, and economic prosperity of the American people whom we serve,” he wrote. “This evolving threat landscape demonstrates the importance of an unwavering focus on the security of the nation’s critical energy infrastructure.”

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Expanding Safety's 'Focus Four' to Cover Health
Expanding Safety's 'Focus Four' to Cover Health tjohnson Thu, 07/11/2019 - 11:28

Expanding Safety's 'Focus Four' to Cover Health

In 1994, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) launched its "Focus Four" initiative, targeting the top four safety hazards in construction: falls from heights, electrocution, crushing injuries (such as trench cave-ins) and being struck by material or equipment.

Last month, the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) created its own "Focus Four" initiative, targeting what it believes to be the top four overall health hazards in construction: manual material handling, noise, air contaminants and high temperature.

On June 18, the AIHA released its booklet, Focus Four for Health: An Initiative to Address Four Major Construction Health Hazards, which was developed by the AIHA Construction Committee.

The document explains that, while there is a lot of attention paid specifically to worker safety hazards in construction jobs, less attention often gets paid to worker health hazards in construction jobs.

"As described in the booklet's introduction, this is partly because illnesses and disorders from many types of health hazards develop slowly—making them harder for employers and employees to recognize compared with injuries," the AIHA stated.

Still, the problems can be serious.

"Unfortunately, health hazards, such as noise or air contaminants, are common in construction," said Matt Gillen, team leader for the Focus Four for Health project. "When health problems occur, they can cut careers short, cause pain and disability, and even cause premature death."

The booklet describes the four common health hazards:

1). Manual material handling can lead to overexertion during lifting, pulling, pushing and carrying. According to the AIHA, these musculoskeletal disorders account for about one-third of all work-related injuries in construction and about half of all workers' compensation costs.

2). High noise levels can cause hearing loss, as well as sleep disturbances, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, depression, and impairment in balance. A study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) found almost three-fourths of construction workers have been exposed to noise levels above the recommended maximums.

3). Air contaminants include dusts, fumes, vapors, and gases, which can cause asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), nervous system problems, kidney damage, and even cancer. More than half of construction workers report being regularly exposed to these contaminants twice or more a week.

4). Finally, Working in excessively high temperatures can lead to heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat syncope (fainting), heat cramps, and/or heat rash.

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Modular Construction Could Change Everything for ECs
Modular Construction Could Change Everything for ECs tjohnson Thu, 07/11/2019 - 11:25

Modular Construction Could Change Everything for ECs

According to a new report from McKinsey & Co., a new trend in construction—modular construction—may completely change the way projects are designed and built and the role all the players in construction undertake during projects.

The report, Modular Construction: From Projects to Products, notes growing interest in modular construction is being driven by significant opportunities for increased speed (cutting project times by up to 50 percent), reduced cost (by as much as 20 percent), greater certainty in planning for both time and cost, and overall improved quality of the structures (including better energy performance and seismic performance).

According to the report, "For decades, construction has lagged other sectors in productivity performance. Now, there is an opportunity for a step change—shifting many aspects of building activity away from traditional onsite projects to offsite manufacturing-style production. While modular (or prefabricated) construction is not a new concept, it is attracting a fresh wave of interest and investment on the back of changes in the technological and economic environment."

The report notes that all players involved in building construction will be affected by the shift to modular construction: developers, designers/engineers, general contractors, OEMs, specialized trades (including electrical contractors) and operations/maintenance.

In terms of growth, the report estimates modular construction could claim as much as $130 billion of the U.S. and European markets by 2030, delivering annual cost savings of $22 billion.

In terms of specific construction type, the report estimates a market potential of $45 billion for multifamily residential, $30 billion for single-family residential, $15 billion for schools, $10 billion for office buildings, $10 billion for hotels, $10 billion for logistics/warehouse facilities, and $5 billion each for retail, hospitals, and other buildings.

In terms of how appealing a project might be for modular construction, the report cites seven factors: regulatory issues, access to materials, supply chain and logistics, labor dynamics, quality perception, local site constraints, and consolidated/continuous demand volumes.

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Building a Home Away From Home: Chewning + Wilmer Provide Electric Installation for VCU Dorm
Building a Home Away From Home: Chewning + Wilmer Provide Electric Installation for VCU Dorm tjohnson Wed, 07/10/2019 - 11:15

Building a Home Away From Home: Chewning + Wilmer Provide Electric Installation for VCU Dorm

Serving as a new place for college freshmen to live and connect with one another, Virginia Commonwealth University’s (VCU) Gladding Residence Center (GRC) brings state-of-the-art lighting and amenities to its growing student population. Chewning + Wilmer Inc. (C+W), Richmond, Va., provided the dormitory’s electric installation. To ensure the dorms were ready for the 2018–2019 school year, C+W, built much of the dorm’s electrical equipment at its prefabrication facility. The team then delivered hundreds of completed kits for installation to the site according to the project schedule.

C+W is approaching a century in business. Established in 1924 to serve central Virginia, it provides large-scale installations, such as conference centers, office complexes, data centers, petrochemical labs and hospitals. It had also previously done work at VCU. In 2016, it completed the VCU Health System Children’s hospital and installed normal and emergency electrical services renovation at the college’s Cabell Library, which is one of the school’s busiest buildings. The library also included a 90,000-square-foot expansion. C+W is working on the VCU Engineering Building expansion two blocks east of the GRC and the VCU Health System Adult Outpatient facility downtown—a 17-story high-rise.

The new GRC construction aimed to serve students’ need for housing options and expand the school’s accommodations by hundreds. The project also preserved history with the Main Street public bath house, which is part of the building’s facade.

The GRC replaces two outdated, four-story residence halls on Main Street in Richmond. The Gladding complex takes up an entire block. An existing building on the block, GRC3, remained occupied throughout construction.

The lounge has LED chandeliers for a bright and fun ambiance. Image credit: Chewning + Wilmer
The lounge has LED chandeliers for a bright and fun ambiance. Image credit: Chewning + Wilmer

With the new development, the school offers incoming students the latest in amenities, including internet, gaming and gathering areas.

Valued at $8.2 million for C+W’s electric and fire alarm installation, the new 12-story, 360,000-square-foot building houses 1,518 first-year students. Aiming for a comfortable, safe environment for sleeping, socializing and studying, the dorm has single- and multiple-occupancy rooms, kitchens, public and private bathrooms, laundry, study spaces and communal areas.

Prefab put to work

C+W began working on the planning phase in March 2016 with the project design team. The goal was to ensure the electrical design could meet budgetary and design requirements.

“This was a bid-build project,” said Evan Rogers, C+W’s project manager. “However, there was significant value engineering performed to assist with owner budgeting.”

From the onset, the team was looking at an aggressive schedule they would have to coordinate tightly, working around the multiple contractors on-site.

Work started with the demolition of the former two dormitories in August 2016, and new construction began in November.

C+W has a prefabrication facility, which enabled the contractor to meet the demanding schedule. At the facility, C+W performed some of the dorm room build-out off-site then delivered them ready for installation.

“We were able to prefab all rough-in components required for power, lighting, fire alarm and tele/data for each room,” Rogers said.

The building's natural light and colorful artwork make the GRC uniquely VCU. Image credit: Chewning + Wilmer
The building's natural light and colorful artwork make the GRC uniquely VCU. Image credit: Chewning + Wilmer

Each rough-in kit contained everything needed to build a room’s electric system, including boxes, rings, brackets, devices (with protective covers), as well as the metal clad (MC) cable and connectors. C+W also prefabricated low-voltage work in some cases.

“We prefabbed all of the trim-out kits, which included addressing all fire alarm devices and labeling all cover plates,” Rogers said.

By building out all dorm components off-site, C+W was able to accomplish a quick installation with minimal waste and good quality control. Prefabricated items were delivered to the site for just-in-time installation. Rogers said prefab helps meet schedule requirements and is safer because it moves labor hours off-site and into a controlled environment.

To accomplish the rough-in and trim-out components for 784 dorm rooms, the prefabrication consisted of close to 5,000 hours of labor.

Over the last few years, prefabrication has helped the company serve many of its large or tightly scheduled projects.

“We try to prefabricate as much as is practical on any given commercial project,” Rogers said. “Job-specific limitations may prohibit some of the prefab that we would like to use. However, on this project, the general contractor was very helpful in facilitating this installation.”

VCU 5 Image Credit: Chewning + Wilmer
Image Credit: Chewning + Wilmer

C+W does logistics

Staging presented another challenge on the college campus. Electrical work done on-site required a space near the system where all lighting, gear, generator and prefab for the rooms could await installation.

“This kept moving material around the site to a minimum,” Rogers said.

The company worked with local vendors to stage the lighting and gear off-site. The dorm-room prefab kits were staged at C+W’s warehouse until the GRC walls were built and ready for installation.

On the east facade, construction crews worked around the shell of a bath house that is a reminder of the school’s earlier days. The 1912 structure had served as a public bath until it was shut down in the ’50s. It has stood empty since then. No infrastructure from that building was reused.

At peak, the EC had 37 electricians on-site. By the time the project was complete, C+W had run approximately 288,000 feet of MC cable—the equivalent of 54 miles. They also installed 5,557 light fixtures and 8,235 receptacles.

VCU 6 Image Credit: Chewning + Wilmer
Image Credit: Chewning + Wilmer

Systems, lighting and power

In addition to streamlining construction through the use of prefab, C+W used building information modeling (BIM) to create a fast, effective model for building the electric system throughout the facility.

The contractor built in redundancy for power in the event of power loss. The company installed a 400-kilowatt Generac generator and three automatic transfer switches: 225, 400 and 800 amperes (A).

The building itself comes with some modern amenities intended to make student life more interesting. A brightly painted and lit public lounge space on the first floor has a game room for the tenants. The electrical contractor installed hanging LED chandeliers in the common areas. The first floor includes residential life and housing offices, the Housing Leadership Center, an exercise room and building support space.

The vaulted ceiling in the lounge and flex space meant the electrical crews worked at high levels. The EC used scissor lifts to hang lighting in those spaces.

Every other floor houses a public kitchen space and laundry for which C+W provided electric service. VCU uses parts of the building for work space with multiple conference rooms and offices on the first floor.

C+W also installed decorative outdoor LED poles and bollards to illuminate the courtyard and sidewalk surrounding the building.

When it came to low-voltage installation, C+W provided the fire alarm system throughout the building, which consisted of Fire Alarm Complete (JCI/Simplex systems) and installation of pathways for all other low-voltage systems.

Throughout this large, 18-month project, despite tight space and deadlines, there were no recordable safety incidents. That was in part thanks to regular safety meetings and proper protocol for work done by electricians and the other contractors on-site.

C+W was able to complete the project and provide occupancy ahead of any liquidated damages or financial penalties. In August 2018, incoming freshmen moved into the new hall.

“Gladding Residence Center is modern and innovative housing designed to help students connect,” said Richard Sliwoski, VCU facilities management associate vice president. “The building’s natural light and colorful artwork make GRC uniquely VCU, but it is the abundance of community spaces that really stand out—community rooms with games and entertainment, common kitchens and flexible study spaces.”

For the C+W team, the project was a matter of large-scale installation, using prefabrication within tight time constraints, which they can take pride in.

“We are proud that we were able to provide a high-quality installation for a great customer but also proud of the jobs that we created,” Rogers said. “This job would not have been possible without the great leadership of our superintendent, Jayson Holloway, and our foremen, Phil Stone, David Harrington and Marcos Herrera who truly made the project a success for C+W.”

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Building a Home Away From Home: Chewning + Wilmer Provide Electric Installation for VCU Dorm
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Chewning + Wilmer Inc. installed electrical service for Virginia Commonwealth University's Gladding Residence Center. Image credit: Chewning + Wilmer


Keeping Current
Keeping Current tjohnson Wed, 07/10/2019 - 11:06

Keeping Current

Everything is getting so complicated. Computers without index fingers are flipping light switches. Data has broken the confines of the cable jacket and now flies freely through the air. Homeowners are not only cutting the cord from the cable company but also the electric utility.

We get it. Electrical construction has changed dramatically over the last couple of decades. Though it may sometimes feel like it, you’re not in the upside down. We’re here to help. Two of our contributors have been making, monitoring and informing you about such changes for many years.

Congratulations go out to Mark C. Ode, who received the NFPA Special Achievement Award, recognizing his contributions to the development of NFPA Codes and Standards and his work on the NEC over the past 31 years. The first electrical Code recipient in the award’s history, Mark C. Ode is undoubtedly a Code expert—it’s in his name, after all. We are immensely fortunate to count him in our ranks. Read his Residential column and his Code Applications column.

In other Mark news, Code Insider contributor Mark Earley received the Richard G. Biermann Award at the NFPA’s 2019 conference in San Antonio in June. The award honors outstanding volunteer work dedicated to the NEC, and Mark, who has been NEC Secretary for 10 cycles and is retiring next month, is an incredibly deserving recipient. You can read his column about how to propose a change to the Code here.

This issue is about those smart buildings that are changing everything about power delivery, low voltage, energy efficiency and so much more.
Perhaps the best advice comes from Wayne Moore in his Fire Focus. In “The Three Musketeers of Integration,” he suggests an alternative to trying to be an expert on every technology and system: hire or consult with a specialist.

To give you the rundown on various finer points of smart building, we begin with “The More the Merrier,” by Jeff Gavin. Wireless is all but expected in the home these days, but it can be a challenge in multitenant buildings. Jeff walks you through the demands and some solutions.

Of course, with all of this wireless data transmission going on, a significant concern has arisen with cybersecurity, and it has reached lighting. For an overview of the problem and how to address it, check out “Defending the Light,” by Craig DiLouie.

Perhaps the greatest change taking place is evolving our world today like plastic did in the mid-20th century. Energy is a commodity, which makes energy efficiency money itself. In “Plugging In,” Chuck Ross covers the trend of homeowners choosing to install batteries and how you can get in on the action.

As efficiency goes, it can be applied to much more than electricity. In “Optimizing Space,” by Claire Swedberg, we learn about all the ways technology enabled by AI can help building owners be more efficient with the way spaces are used. Claire also writes about Chewning + Wilmer, an EC that helped build a new dorm at Virginia Commonwealth University. Read it here.

Learning everything this industry has expanded to may feel daunting. It is. We’re here for you.

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New Definitions and Revisions: Significant Changes in the 2020 NEC, Part 2
New Definitions and Revisions: Significant Changes in the 2020 NEC, Part 2 tjohnson Mon, 07/08/2019 - 13:53

New Definitions and Revisions: Significant Changes in the 2020 NEC, Part 2

Last month, Part 1 of this series focused on general revisions in the introduction and provided a look at some new articles added in the 2020 National Electrical Code (NEC) . As this series continues, it will provide the NEC revisions in sequence. This article focuses on defined terms that have been revised and new definitions that have been added in this edition of the Code . Definitions in the NEC are arranged in three parts of Article 100.

Article 100 Definitions of Fault Current and Fault Current, Available

New definitions of the terms “fault current” and “fault current, available” have been added to Article 100. This revision aligns with similar recent revisions in other standards that use the terms, such as NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace.

Fault Current: The current delivered at a point on the system during a short-circuit condition. ( Code Making Panel-10)

Fault Current, Available (Available Fault Current): The largest amount of current capable of being delivered at a point on the system during a short-circuit condition. (CMP-10)

Article 100 Habitable Room

A new definition of the term “habitable room” has been added to Article 100. The definition describes what constitutes a habitable room and differentiates it from one that is not. The new definition aligns with the same defined term in NFPA 5000 with similar context to the defined term in the International Residential Code and International Building Code.

Habitable Room: A room in a building for living, sleeping, eating, cooking, but excluding bathrooms, toilet rooms, closets, hallways, storage or utility spaces, and similar areas. (CMP-2)

Article 100 Labeled—Informational Note Added

A new informational note has been added following the definition of the term “Labeled.” Clarification has been provided about what constitutes labeling as the NEC defines. The labeling can appear on the smallest package of the product in cases where the equipment is small or installed in a harsh environment.

Informational Note: If a listed product is of such a size, shape, material or surface texture that is not possible to legibly apply the complete label to the product, the complete label may appear on the smallest unit container in which the product is packaged.

Article 100 Laundry Area

A new definition of the term “Laundry Area” has been added to Part I of Article 100. The definition formerly found in Section 550.2 is no longer necessary and has been deleted.

Laundry Area: An area containing or designed to contain a laundry tray, clothes washer or clothes dryer. (CMP-2)

Article 100 Messenger or Messenger Wire

A definition of the terms “messenger” and “messenger wire” have been added to Article 100. This unique definition applies to either term used within the NEC. A messenger can be current-carrying or be dead-ended on both ends and used only for support.

Messenger or Messenger Wire: A wire that is run along with or integral with a cable or conductor to provide mechanical support for the cable or conductor. (CMP-6)

Article 100 Prime Mover

An example of a prime mover is the engine that drives the electric generator on a generator set.

Prime Mover: The machine that supplies mechanical horsepower to a generator. (CMP-13)

Article 100 Reconditioned

A new definition of the term “reconditioned” has been added in Part I of Article 100. The process of reconditioning equipment differs from normal servicing of equipment that remains in place. The term “reconditioned” and related general requirements were introduced in the 2017 NEC in Section 110.21(A)(2). During the 2020 NEC development process, this term was incorporated in multiple articles that added provisions related to equipment that is either permitted or prohibited from being reconditioned. Accordingly, the NEC process yielded a common definition of the term “reconditioned” and included it in Article 100 in compliance with Section 2.2.2.1 of the NEC Style Manual.

Reconditioned: Electromechanical systems, equipment, apparatus or components that are restored to operating conditions. This process differs from normal servicing of equipment that remains within a facility or replacement of listed equipment on a one-to-one basis. (CMP-10)

Informational Note: The term reconditioned is frequently referred to as rebuilt, refurbished or remanufactured.

Article 100 Service Equipment

The definition of the term “service equipment” has been revised. The word “usually” was removed to reduce ambiguity, and the NEC term “disconnecting means” has replaced the word “cutoff.” Technical responsibility of this definition has been reassigned from CMP-4 to CMP-10.

Service Equipment: The necessary equipment, consisting of a circuit breaker(s) or switch(es) and fuse(s) and their accessories, connected to the serving utility and intended to constitute the main control and disconnect of the serving utility. (CMP-10)

This series continues next month.

Page Title
New Definitions and Revisions: Significant Changes in the 2020 NEC, Part 2
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