Lancaster, PA Electrician Directory

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Homeowners need electricians to install new modern circuit breaker electrical service panels replacing antiquated fuse panels. You may need extra outlets installed in an older home that didn't have electrical receptacles installed in every corner of the home. Perhaps you're installing ceiling fans and need them wired to switch panels on the walls. Or, you want to add a hot tub to your backyard and need electrical service installed. You'll find electricians available for all of these services and more here on lancaster electrical .com.

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DOE Spotlights DC Innovation
DOE Spotlights DC Innovation tjohnson Tue, 02/19/2019 - 12:30

DOE Spotlights DC Innovation

As the nation’s mix of energy sources continues to evolve, the need for distribution innovation also increases.

Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced awards for projects that find new ways to harness the benefits of medium-voltage direct current (DC) technology to increase reliability, safety and efficiency on the grid.

The 12 projects, which received a combined award of $35 million, include eight from the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Building Reliable Electronics to Achieve Kilovolt Effective Ratings Safely (BREAKERS) program, plus four of the latest OPEN+ cohort, Kilovolt Devices.

ARPA-E is a DOE program that advances high-potential, high-impact energy technologies that are too early for private-sector investment. The OPEN+ program offers awards to technologies from across the entire scope of ARPA-E’s energy mission. Projects are grouped into cohorts around a specific subject area.

The eight BREAKERS projects that received the recently announced award will work to develop new DC devices to better manage power by eliminating electrical faults, improving efficiency and reaction times, and potentially enabling greater proliferation of energy storage and renewable resources. The four Kilovolt Devices OPEN+ projects will focus on a variety of challenges facing power electronics in the medium-voltage space, with a particular eye toward grid security and reliability.

Examples include a silicon carbide-based, DC circuit breaker design being developed by Eaton Corp. It boosts efficiency and can scale up or down medium-voltage application requirements. Another project, developed at Ohio State University, will create gallium nitride (GaN) semiconductor materials suitable for high voltage (15–20 kilovolts) power control and conversion.

Medium-voltage DC circuit breakers have the potential to introduce significant improvements to the nation’s electrical system, for which most power is transmitted over alternating current.

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Industry Fighting Back Against Job-Site Drug Use
Industry Fighting Back Against Job-Site Drug Use tjohnson Fri, 02/15/2019 - 11:57

Industry Fighting Back Against Job-Site Drug Use

Drug use in the construction industry is a concern for all contractors. According to “Occupational Patterns in Unintentional and Undetermined Drug-Involved and Opioid-Involved Overdose Deaths” study released by the Centers for Disease Control last year, construction occupations had the highest proportional rate for drug-overdose deaths and heroin-related and prescription opioid-related overdose deaths.

According to Wes Wheeler, NECA's national director of safety, "I do not believe that drug use in the electrical industry is in any way less of a problem than it is for all of construction or employment in general.”

In fact, according to Wheeler, one of an electrical contractor's biggest concerns is workers who are taking medications that affect their alertness, especially if they are operating heavy equipment or machinery.

Marijuana is a specific substance of note. Wheeler believes, with recent moves toward the legalization of marijuana, workers may be more inclined to not see it as a major issue or one that can have a negative impact on the workforce.

"They think there are no effects on them in the workplace, when they could actually be putting themselves, coworkers, public citizens, and owner personnel at risk as a result of prescription misuse or illegal use of marijuana," he said.

A second major concern is the misuse and overuse of prescription opioid medications by workers.

"Opioids are meant to provide a temporary relief during recovery for pain that could be associated with an injury, either on the job or off the job from extracurricular activities," he said.

However, a trend often referred to as the "Opioid Crisis" has arisen, and for workers in construction, it can be very dangerous when they continue to take these medications after they are healed.

"While taking these types of medications, a worker's responses may be affected and could result in a more serious injury, affecting them or others," he said.

A third area of concern are stimulants such as caffeine-enhanced over-the-counter medications, including some allergy medications, which can affect a worker's mental alertness and possibly convince workers they are stronger than they actually are.

"A related concern is that these stimulants may also cause other medical issues, if there are any underlying health issues the worker may not be aware of," Wheeler said.

Furthermore, when workers mix over-the-counter medications with prescription medications, other very dangerous side effects can result.

In sum, according to Wheeler, the two major concerns in the workplace for contractors are marijuana and painkillers.

"The most widely used illegal drug would probably be marijuana, since it is available to all social classes in the U.S. and around the world, including electrical contractor personnel," he said. "Overuse and misuse of legal drugs, such as oxycodone, a pain killer, create dependency in the individual that manifests itself as a priority and need for that individual to obtain this medication at all costs."

NECA sponsors a Drug Free Workplace Program that includes drug screening according to all legal requirements, in conjunction with working with insurance carriers that provide resources that the employer can use to train and screen personnel.

"Being aware of an employer's rights to know what medications and the side effects of those medications are that a worker may be taking is another way that employers can help manage their exposures and risks," Wheeler said. "There are also many Employee Assistance Programs available through insurance and workers' compensation carriers that can educate management personnel on these issues. Working with our partners in the industry is key to keeping everyone safe."

Geary Higgins, NECA's vice president of labor relations, agrees with the importance of widespread cooperation and addressing the drug issue from multiple angles.

"NECA and the IBEW are working on the drug problem from two different approaches," he said. "First, almost all of our labor agreements contain language that requires drug testing of individuals, both pre-hire as well as on a random basis."

This combined approach is designed to screen out applicants whose drug activities may pose a danger and then test workers randomly once they are on the job for safety purposes.

If an employee tests positive for opioids, the preferred protocol is to ensure the person has a valid prescription for that drug and that the dosage of the prescription is determined to be safe. However, even in this case, Higgins believes it is probably not a good idea to allow that person to work at a job site. One reason is that, even at low doses, the opioids could impact the worker's ability to work safely.

"In addition, if someone needs to be on serious pain medication, he probably shouldn't be working anyway," he said.

The second approach relates to healthcare plans.

"I can't speak for all of them, but I do sit as a trustee on one of the largest ones that we have, which insures about 42,000 IBEW members, plus their families, which ends up being about 100,000 total," Higgins said.

This plan utilizes the services of a drug firm called Sav-Rx, which provides drug benefits. One of the first things that Sav-Rx does when it receives a request from anyone on the plan who has a prescription for opioids is to see if there are any other options for that person other than an opioid. If there is no alternative to the opioid, then Sav-Rx will ensure the prescribed level is appropriate for the person's health situation and that he or she is not on the drug any longer than is considered medically necessary. Finally, if someone ends up being prescribed a dosage of opioids that is considered at the high end, that case gets a second look and inspection from Sav-Rx to determine what the details are.

"In other words, we are trying to control not only the use, but the abuse, of these drugs, through these processes," Higgins said.

Electri International, the Foundation for Electrical Construction Inc., hosted a roundtable discussion about the opioid crisis at its January meeting. It touched on awareness, training, testing and support from the employers’ perspective. Electri will release a white paper soon that will be available on its website, electri.org.

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Penn State's 70-MW Solar Project to Reduce Emissions, Power School for 25 Years
Penn State's 70-MW Solar Project to Reduce Emissions, Power School for 25 Years tjohnson Thu, 02/14/2019 - 11:23

Penn State's 70-MW Solar Project to Reduce Emissions, Power School for 25 Years

Pennsylvania State University and Lightsource BP are partnering to develop a 70-megawatt (MW) project, which will provide 25 percent of the university’s electricity needs for 25 years, according to a university press release. Expected to be completed in July 2020, the project offers a way for the university to lower its annual electricity costs and greenhouse gas emissions by 57,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year. This is the equivalent of taking more than 15,000 cars off the road.

The project includes 150,000 large-scale ground-mounted solar panels across three locations, adding up to 500 acres in Franklin County, Pa, near Penn State’s Mont Alto campus. The 70-MW project, which is also expected to reduce local air pollution, is tied for the largest solar project in the state.

“This project is a win for Penn State, a win for Pennsylvania and a win for the environment,” said Rob Cooper, senior director of energy and engineering in Penn State's Office of Physical Plant. “Among the many benefits of this significant investment in solar-based electric generation include cost savings, lower greenhouse-gas emissions in support of Penn State’s aggressive sustainability goals, economic development with job creation, and income for host communities through development of the Pennsylvania solar market.”

Lightsource BP is a partnership formed in 2018 between Lightsource Renewable Energy and BP. The companies work together to accelerate low-carbon energy access for communities around the world, according to its website.

“Our Pennsylvania-located solar projects will drive economic development and job growth, increase biodiversity, support Penn State’s sustainability goals, and provide a cleaner, healthier environment for the community,” said Katherine Ryzhaya, Lightsource BP’s chief commercial officer.

Penn State plans to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 35 percent by 2020, according to its strategic plan. Since 2005, the university has reduced its emissions by 32 percent.

This off-site solar project continues the university’s progress toward that goal, allowing it to reach a 43-percent emissions reduction. Penn State has also eliminated coal at the West Campus Steam Plant, installed a solar array that provides power to charge its 100 percent electric vehicles, and installed an on-site 2-MW solar array that provides 1 percent of the university’s electricity needs.

“This project not only provides the university with a reliable and sustainable energy source, but continues our progress toward our GHG reduction goals,” said David Gray, senior vice president for finance and business at Penn State. “Our goals and this project align with Gov. Wolf’s executive order establishing the first statewide goal to reduce carbon pollution and procure renewable energy to offset at least 40 percent of the Commonwealth’s annual electricity usage.”

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A solar panel on Penn State's University Park campus. Photo Credit: Patrick Mansell


IBM, Oncor Team Up for Predictive Utility Maintenance
IBM, Oncor Team Up for Predictive Utility Maintenance tjohnson Tue, 02/12/2019 - 11:23

IBM, Oncor Team Up for Predictive Utility Maintenance

Information technology company IBM has launched a predictive analytics tool that—combined with artificial intelligence—helps utilities better spot which trees and other vegetation within their service territory need to be trimmed or removed to keep their grid running.

IBM worked with Oncor Electric Delivery Co., the largest utility company in Texas, to develop the solution, The Weather Company Vegetation Management—Predict, built on the cloud-based platform, IBM PAIRS Geoscope.

The solution analyzes geospatial and time-based data on vegetation growth collected by a wide swath of devices, including satellites, drones, aerial flights, internet of things (IoT) sensors and weather models. The insights are then used to predict which vegetation is encroaching upon power lines, so utilities can proactively respond with preventive maintenance measures.

“Our utilities clients told us that getting detailed insight into the state of vegetation across their service territory was a key challenge,” Mahesh Sudhakaran, chief digital officer of IBM Energy, Environment and Utilities, said in a press release.

“By combining PAIRS with AI and industry expertise, we can give clients one integrated solution, delivered through IBM Hybrid Cloud, to help them predict and manage vegetation in a cost-effective and intelligent way,” Sudhakaran said.

IBM’s solution is vastly superior to the traditional approach of vegetation management, which involves conducting on-site inspections and keeping track manually of when areas were last trimmed, said Oncor’s vegetation management program manager Peter Stoltman.

“Vegetation poses a serious risk to power lines and the surrounding areas, but monitoring it is a challenging and time-consuming process,” Stoltman said. “By working with IBM, we are able to use analytics and AI to prioritize high-risk areas. This helps us adapt maintenance operations to improve public safety and service reliability.”

Better vegetation management helps ensure overall grid reliability and compliance, wildfire prevention, storm management and assessment, said Cameron Clayton, IBM’s general manager of Watson Media and Weather.

“The ability to layer weather data with satellite and sensor data gives utility companies powerful new insights to help them improve operations and minimize impact on their customers,” Clayton said.

Vegetation management is at the core in the case of Pacific Gas & Electric Co., which is under scrutiny for allegedly sparking several California wildfires last year due to the utility company’s inadequate maintenance practices. PG&E is currently awaiting U.S. District Judge William Alsu​p’s decision whether the company now has to inspect and trim trees across its entire grid.

“Vegetation management is typically a pretty dry subject, but the PG&E saga has brought it front and center in utility news,” writes Robert Walton for UtilityDive. “The utility recently warned a federal judge that actions he is considering taking would require it to remove more than 100 million trees — an impossible task, the utility said…. Could IBM's geospatial solution help PG&E?”

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Puerto Rico Proposal Calls for the Largest U.S. Solar Battery Storage Capacity
Puerto Rico Proposal Calls for the Largest U.S. Solar Battery Storage Capacity hfullmer Fri, 02/08/2019 - 16:29

Puerto Rico Proposal Calls for the Largest U.S. Solar Battery Storage Capacity

Puerto Rico’s publicly owned electric utility Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) released a draft of its 2019 integrated resource plan (IRP), which outlines the utility’s strategy continued post-Hurricane Maria recovery and future development over the next 20 years.

The plan sets up several methods to make the energy grid more robust after Hurricane Maria decimated the American commonwealth in September 2017. The hurricane resulted in the deaths of thousands and destroyed its electrical grid, leaving much of the island without power for months and many residents stranded in dire situations.

To increase the system's reliability, the IRP points to the use of microgrids, including eight “MiniGrids” or localized, self-sufficient zones that could produce necessary energy during and after major storms.

Authorities have also included several initiatives to make Puerto Rico rely more heavily on renewable energy sources. This is in line with a pledge Puerto Rico made in November 2018 to use 100 percent renewable energy by 2050. The plan calls for 2,220 megawatts (MW) of solar energy and 1,080 MW of battery storage, an astonishing amount considering the Sierra Club reports “the entire U.S. grid currently only includes 1031 MW of storage”, referencing Bloomberg NEF numbers. 

The draft also includes phase outs for the use of coal and bunker oil, which the island currently imports at a high cost.

At the same time, provisions within the document seemed to put these renewable goals on the back burner or even act against them. The restoration efforts outlined in the IRP also includes three additional liquid natural gas import facilities, which clean energy advocates like the Sierra Club de Puerto Rico are fighting against.

Another point of contention is what the Sierra Club de Puerto Rico calls the IRP’s, “assumption that PREPA will be privatized.” For example, the energy plan mentions that the proposed microgrids “could be owned by the utility or private entities.”

Even before Hurricane Maria, PREPA was more than $9 billion in debt, which was consolidated as part of a deal in the spring of 2018—a move that Jose Carrion, chairman of the oversight board, said would "support the privatization and transformation of PREPA," according to Bloomberg.

While proponents see the move as a means to make the utility viable in the long term, the Sierra Club argues that PREPA “is the people of Puerto Rico’s greatest public resource.”

A finalized energy plan is expected to be released on February 12.

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Mid-City Electric Gets New Ohio State Athletics Complex Up and Running
Mid-City Electric Gets New Ohio State Athletics Complex Up and Running mkraus Fri, 02/08/2019 - 11:36

Mid-City Electric Gets New Ohio State Athletics Complex Up and Running

In the world of college athletics, having state-of-the-art facilities is crucial. At Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, local contractor Mid-City Electric Co. helped to make sure the advanced systems in the university’s latest Schumaker Complex were up and running without a hitch.

Mid-City Electric, also based in Columbus, provided installation of the technical pathways (cable tray/conduit), as well as structured cabling, wireless access points and sound systems for the low-voltage systems in the new complex, said Michael Colosimo, project manager at Mid-City Electric.

The Schumaker Complex is the new training hub for 33 teams at Ohio State—specifically the Olympic sports teams. According to the university, it was built to boost the nutritional, physical and psychological development of the student-athletes on these teams. The 108,000-square-foot facility is designed to serve more than 800 student-athletes, including 15,500 square feet of training space and 2,600 square feet of classroom space. It also hosts more than 50 coaches and support staff.

The project required a large number of speakers and sound systems throughout the facility. In many of the performance areas, large speakers had to be lifted and placed on the ceiling. Smaller speakers are also all over the complex.

“We hung a lot of the large speakers overhead, weighing about 120 pounds apiece,” Colosimo said. “Inside a lot of the locker rooms, classrooms, things like that, they had a lot of speakers [we had to install].”

Weight room with speakers overhead
Mid-City Electric installed overhead speakers, which weighed up to 120 pounds apiece. Image courtesy of Ohio State University

One of the most interesting aspects of the project was dynamic glass by a company called View, which intelligently changes throughout the day to allow the correct amount of daylight into the complex.

“It’s a system by where you can control the dimming for the glass,” Colosimo said. “It can change colors. It can block out the sun.”

For the lobby in particular, an extensive amount of cabling was used to connect the View glass. Each pane of glass required its own cable, which then was connected back to the system.

Another example of the complex's connectivity can be found in the offices and meeting rooms. In these areas, Mid-City installed an overhead ceiling enclosure that fit into a 2-by-2-foot area. Inside that enclosure are hookups for power, HDMI, etc. It acts as a hub for the technology in each room.

“We probably hung about 200 of these things in various areas,” Colosimo said.

The foremen on the project were Titan Kingery, electrical, and Krysten Lambert, technology. Mid-City Electric was contracted to perform the work by Soundcom Systems, based in Cleveland.

“They were putting in all the high-end technologies,” Colosimo said. “We were their installation arm.”

Schumaker complex lobby
The 108,000-square-foot facility is designed to serve more than 800 student-athletes. Image courtesy of Ohio State University

The Schumaker Complex opened in late 2018. It is named for frequent university donors the Schumaker and Trott family, which provided the foundational funding for the facility. A 2018 university announcement named 53 donors who contributed $25,000 or more to the facility.

Mid-City has worked on other Ohio State buildings and complexes in the past, including Mount Hall, Oxley and Pomerene Hall, the North Residential Fitness Center, and various projects at the James Cancer Hospital and the Wexner Medical Center. The company was founded in 1960 and does both electrical and teldata work on new construction and renovation projects in Central Ohio. It also provides service and maintenance, as well as upgrades.

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Energy Storage Increasingly Critical to Defend Against Outages
Energy Storage Increasingly Critical to Defend Against Outages tjohnson Fri, 02/08/2019 - 10:58

Energy Storage Increasingly Critical to Defend Against Outages

Beyond the fight against climate change, renewable energies and energy storage are teaming up to provide stability and protection for important facilities that can’t afford to be disrupted by outages.

According to “Advanced Batteries for Critical Infrastructure,” published by market analyst Navigant Research, advances in the field of storage technology are expanding the use of batteries to provide protection against outages in mission-critical operations.

Published in the first quarter of 2019, it examines the market trends affecting the deployment of so-called advanced batteries for critical infrastructure (ABCI).

Navigant notes that power failures are inevitable and that extended blackouts are a major source of public risk and financial loss. The company adds that commercial facility operators have a need to provide a stable electricity supply that allows operations to continue even in the event of a total power failure.

The study finds facility managers are increasingly relying on ABCI solutions that incorporate distributed energy storage system (DESS) technology. Navigant Research identifies four qualifying characteristics of advanced batteries that make them ideal candidates for critical power needs.

Advanced batteries have much shorter startup times relative to fossil fuel generators. They are silent and emissions free, and they can be housed in a building more readily than fossil fuel generators. In contrast to fossil fuel storage facilities, which will eventually deplete their fuel source, an advanced battery can recharge itself with renewables every day. Lastly, advanced batteries can derive their energy from a sustainable, renewable source like wind or solar.

These four characteristics will enable the rapid growth of ABCI over the next decade. According to Navigant, the annual global market for deploying ABCI will grow from 262.3 megawatts in 2018 to 9.6 gigawatts in 2027. Global revenue is expected to reach nearly $21 billion.

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Energy Storage Increasingly Critical to Defend Against Outages
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ISO Publishes New International Standard for BIM
ISO Publishes New International Standard for BIM tjohnson Fri, 02/08/2019 - 10:19

ISO Publishes New International Standard for BIM

Building information modeling (BIM) has been gaining popularity in recent years, given its ability to provide architecture, engineering and construction professionals with insights and tools on how to more efficiently plan, design, construct and manage building infrastructure.

Until now, BIM has been managed in its own way by each entity that is using the technology. In late January, however, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) announced it is publishing a new set of International Standards for BIM, allowing it to be managed consistently across projects and borders.

"More construction means a greater need for efficient ways of working, which is why the 3D model-based approach of BIM in delivering construction projects is gaining traction worldwide," the ISO stated. BIM's growing popularity is "creating a need for an international framework that allows the industry to work together across projects and national borders."

The first two parts of the new BIM standard (ISO 19650, titled, "Organization and digitization of information about buildings and civil engineering works, including building information modeling [BIM] - Information management using building information modeling"), have just been published by ISO.

"ISO 19650 was developed on the basis of the tried-and-tested British standard, BS 1192, and publicly available specification PAS 1192-2, which have already been shown to help users save up to 22 percent in construction costs," said Jons Sjogren, chair of the ISO technical subcommittee that developed the standards. "Taking this to an international level not only means more effective collaboration on global projects but allows designers and contractors working on all kinds of building works to have clearer and more efficient information management."

Future standards in the series will include one on "managing the operational phase of assets," and one on "security-minded building information modeling, digital build environments, and smart asset management."

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ISO Publishes New International Standard for BIM
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NFPA Report: Growing Concern for Contractor Worker Deaths Due to Electrical Incidents
NFPA Report: Growing Concern for Contractor Worker Deaths Due to Electrical Incidents tjohnson Fri, 02/08/2019 - 09:55

NFPA Report: Growing Concern for Contractor Worker Deaths Due to Electrical Incidents

According to a new report from the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), "Fatal Electrical Injuries of Contract Workers," the construction industry experienced a "substantial share" of contractor deaths involving electrical incidents during the five-year period (2012–2016) the NFPA studied.

The report noted a total of 325 electrical fatalities occurred involving contract workers, which are defined as workers "employed by one firm but working at the behest of another firm that exercises overall responsibility for the operation at the site." The construction industry in specific experienced 251 of these electrical fatalities—approximately two-thirds of the total fatalities for contract workers.

Of the 325 total contract worker electrical fatalities, exactly 100 (31 percent) were to electricians. The majority of the remaining 225 were to workers involved in other construction-related occupations.

These counts included bother direct and indirect electrical contact. Examples of direct electrical contact that led to fatalities included coming into contact with electrified machinery or equipment, contact with power lines, coming into contact with an electrical arc, contact with electrical fences, etc. Examples of indirect electrical contact included contact with water, pipes, or some other material that was unintentionally conducting electricity, as well as workers carrying ladders that contacted live power lines.

The months with the most frequency for these fatalities were June (12 percent), July (15 percent), August (14 percent) and September (11 percent).

As a way to help reduce this number of fatalities, the NFPA suggests the following:

  • Contractors should establish reasonable expectations for when work will get done and not promise unrealistic deliverables in hopes of landing a contract.
  • Owners should select contractors based on reliability and safety considerations.
  • Contractors should do the same when selecting subcontractors.
  • Top management should communicate with supervisors, whose responsibilities should include both keeping production on track and ensuring work is done safely, and that safety must not be compromised when schedules are threatened.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has collected data on fatal work injuries of contract workers in specific as part of its annual Censes of Fatal Occupational Injuries.

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NFPA Report: Growing Concern for Contractor Worker Deaths Due to Electrical Incidents
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Illinois Tops USGBC's Ninth Annual LEED Leaderboard
Illinois Tops USGBC's Ninth Annual LEED Leaderboard tjohnson Thu, 02/07/2019 - 09:06

Illinois Tops USGBC's Ninth Annual LEED Leaderboard

Each year, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) ranks the top 10 states for LEED, its green building rating system. This year, Illinois jumped two spots from 2017 to take first place.

The 2018 top 10 includes some familiar faces, with eight of the ranked states having positioned in last year's results. Behind Illinois was, in order, Massachusetts, Washington, New York, Texas, Colorado, Hawaii, Virginia, California, and Maryland. Washington and Texas were the newcomers.

In 2017, the rankings panned out a little differently with Massachusetts in the top spot and New York, Illinois, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, Georgia, California, Virginia, and Colorado composing the top 10.

The 2018 results break down in some interesting ways. Despite the USGBC crowning Illinois champion, it actually trailed behind California, Texas and New York in total certified gross square footage (GSF). California almost doubled the certified GSF of Illinois, and it dwarfed Illinois' total number of certified projects at 521 versus 172. However, the USGBC ranks the states in GSF per capita, and in that metric, Illinois narrowly beat out Massachusetts for the top spot with 5.31 GSF per capita compared with 5.30.

Top 10 States for LEED Green Building
Image credit: USGBC

Of note, Washington, D.C., checked in with a GSF per capita of 61.74, which would put it overwhelmingly in first place. The USGBC does not rank the District, though, since it is a federal territory. The USGBC noted that Washington, D.C., was the world's first city to be LEED certified in 2017 when it registered 39.83 certified GSF per capita.

Cities have proved to be focal points for LEED-certified buildings. The USGBC said nine of 2018's top 10 states contain LEED-certified cities, such as Chicago, Seattle, and Austin.

The top 10 combined for 1,826 projects and contained almost two-thirds (63 percent) of the total LEED projects (2,886) in the United States. The top 10 combined for 468.85 million GSF, which was 76 percent of the total 615.27 million GSF in the United States.

Top 10 States for LEED Details
Image credit: USGBC

This is all up from the 2017 data, which registered 2,647 total projects and 484.56 million certified GSF. Year over year, across the United States, more LEED certified projects were constructed, and they grew in size on average.

The USGBC projects that green building will continue to grow through 2021, and it said client demand drives LEED adoption as owners seek to promote occupant health and well-being.

This is the list's ninth year, and it considered commercial and institutional projects that were certified through 2018.

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Illinois Tops USGBC's Ninth Annual LEED Leaderboard
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